Washington,

DC's pre-War Apartments

Washington,

DC's pre-War Apartments

Welcome to

The Broadmoor Cooperative

3601 Connecticut Ave. NW

Washington, DC


The Broadmoor is certainly one of the most attractive and famous apartment buildings in Washington, DC. The first residents moved into the Broadmoor in October, 1929 within days of the infamous stock market crash which heralded the beginning of the Great Depression. The building originally operated a hotel/apartment and offered all the services available in a first class hotel. The builders were Harry Bralove and Edward Ernst and the architect was a young Joseph Abel (still a student at the time!) who became one of DC's most famous and prolific architects and who went on to design apartment buildings at 2101,4701, 477 and 4740 Connecticut Ave. as well as the  Shoreham on Calvert Street. The Broadmoor building is U shaped and sits on an acre of land one block north of the Cleveland Park Metro station. It's design is of the "International Style"  popular in the 1920's and features an innovation which has become a requirement of almost all subsequent building structures throughout the world ... an underground parking garage! This garage was among the first built in DC, was two stories and has the capacity to park 118 automobiles. The Broadmoor sits on a full acre of land and has both front and rear lawn and garden areas well known for their perennial ornamental plantings. The front lawn and driveway are still bordered by the original herringbone patterned brick sidewalk and serpentine wall.  The open lawn spaces give the apartments very bright and airy window views. There are 194 apartments in all: 2 three bedrooms, 55 two bedrooms, 105 one bedrooms,  32 studios and 3 guest rooms which are available to the residents for their visitors. The gracious port-cochere, sunny vestibule and dramatic Art-Deco lobby have offered welcome home greetings to many DC personalities over the years including Senator Huey Long, Senator John Sparkman, Senator Prentiss Brown, Rep. Richard Nixon, George Meany, the Japanese Ambassador at the time of the Pearl Harbor attack  and even Archduke Otto Hapsburg, the heir to the imperial throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.  In 1948, the building was converted to cooperative ownership and proved extremely popular; over 100 apartments were sold the very first day and the building completely sold out with one month.      
 James C. Sweeney
​Associate-Broker
 
WC & AN Miller REALTORS
​ A Long & Foster Company
Bethesda All Points Office
4701 Sangamore Rd.
Bethesda, MD 20816 Office Phone: 301-229-4000 Cell/Direct: 202-320-6077
E-mail: Jim@TheSweeneyTeam.com
​Website: www.TheSweeneyTeam.com